The Innis (Ennis) House (part 2)

The Innis (Ennis) House is the only remaining historic structure located along the Sunken Road on the National Park’s Fredericksburg Battlefield land.  It was owned by Martha who went by any of three last names: Farrow, Innis and Stephens, based upon city land tax records, court cases, U.S. Census records, Deed Book records and newspaper stories. I use the names interchangeably, as did she. Currently we are focused upon the Continue reading

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The Innis (Ennis) House (part 1)

The Innis (Ennis) House is the only remaining historic structure located along the Sunken Road on the National Park’s Fredericksburg Battlefield land.  The house was built sometime prior to 1850 although the actual construction date is unknown. There is record of a structure ‘below Brompton’ when John Howison sold his property to a group of land investors in 1854. This group was headed up by John S. Caldwell.  By 1856, the Continue reading

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155th Fredericksburg Remembrance Walk (Pt 2)

I continue to review the Remembrance Walk conducted by the National Park Service (NPS) on Sunday, December 10th. This was the 155th Anniversary of the Battle of Fredericksburg, conducted by the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. This innovative approach focused on remembering the entire Fredericksburg community and its trial under fire from the perspective of: Union and Confederate soldiers, the people of the community, free and enslaved, young and old, those who evacuated and those who remained the living and the dead. NPS Chief Historian John Continue reading

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155th Fredericksburg Remembrance Walk (Pt 1)

Sunday, December 10th, marked the 155th Anniversary of the Battle of Fredericksburg. The Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park decided to make a significant programmatic change in how the anniversary was remembered. According to National Park Service (NPS) Chief Historian John Hennessey, they “decided to take a different approach to the Fredericksburg Battle Anniversary. For the last two decades we have held a rather static event, always in front of the Kirkland monument, always with re-enactors providing color and presence, an emcee, and a keynote speaker.

This year we experimented with something more dynamic, something that was not explicitly commemorative, but instead allowed visitors to make a gesture if they wished to, at the site of their choosing.”

S1-Irish-Bde-walk-web

City of Fredericksburg Memorial Park located at George and Barton Street with National Park Service historian Frank O’Reilly addressing members of the Irish Brigade re-en-actors and 85 members of the public at a war memorial park.

Those who braved the cold weather on Sunday were in for a real treat. Following the traditional walk at 11:30 A.M. of the Irish Brigade from City Docks – the middle crossing site – up to the Sunken Road, the program took on an entirely new look and feel. At 2:00 Continue reading

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Unfinished Railroad Cut – part 2

In the last post, I explored the unfinished railroad cut located in Fredericksburg.  It was created in the early years of American railroad construction in Virginia. In this post, I will be looking at the Union infantry regiments who traversed the cut during the battle of Fredericksburg and the Confederate artillery units who fired upon their movement in the cut.

This post is heavily indebted to the work of National Park Service (NPS) historian and author Francis Augustin O’Reilly and his book on the battle of Fredericksburg.

In total, parts of five Union brigades from three separate Corps played a part in the “unfinished” railroad cut story. All these brigades began their movement in lower Continue reading

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